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Herby Barley Salad with Butter-Basted Mushrooms

Herby Barley Salad with Butter-Basted Mushrooms


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Any chewy grain, such as wheat berries, farro, or even brown rice, can replace the barley.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup hulled, hull-less, or pearl barley
  • 2 shallots, thinly sliced into rings
  • 8 ounces mushrooms (such as maitake, chanterelle, and/or oyster), torn or cut into large pieces
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1½ ounces Parmesan, shaved, plus more for serving

Recipe Preparation

  • Cook barley in a medium pot of boiling salted water until tender, 50–60 minutes for hulled or hull-less, 20–30 minutes for pearl. Drain; spread out on a baking sheet and let cool.

  • Meanwhile, cook shallots in vegetable oil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat, swirling pan occasionally to keep shallots from burning, until golden brown, 5–7 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer shallots to paper towels to drain; season with salt. Let cool. Set shallot cooking oil aside.

  • Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high until just beginning to smoke. Arrange mushrooms in skillet in a single layer and cook, undisturbed, until undersides are golden brown, about 3 minutes. Season mushrooms with salt and pepper, toss, and continue to cook, tossing often and reducing heat as needed to avoid scorching, until golden brown all over, about 5 minutes longer.

  • Reduce heat to medium and add thyme sprigs, garlic, and butter to skillet. Tip skillet toward you so butter pools at edge and use a spoon to baste mushrooms with foaming butter; cook until butter smells nutty. Using a slotted spoon, transfer mushrooms to a small bowl, leaving thyme and garlic behind.

  • Toss cooled barley, cilantro, parsley, lemon juice, 1½ oz. Parmesan, and 2 Tbsp. reserved shallot oil in a large bowl to combine; season with salt and pepper. Add mushrooms; toss again to combine.

  • Just before serving, top with fried shallots and more shaved Parmesan.

  • Do Ahead: Barley can be cooked 1 day ahead. Let cool; store airtight and chill. Dish can be made 3 hours ahead; store tightly wrapped at room temperature.

,Photos by Christopher Testani

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 270 Fat (g) 19 Saturated Fat (g) 6 Cholesterol (mg) 20 Carbohydrates (g) 22 Dietary Fiber (g) 4 Total Sugars (g) 1 Protein (g) 5 Sodium (mg) 80Reviews Sectionso. much. umami. i followed the recipe with the exact ingredient list and measurements above and it came together beautifully. depending on the kind of mushroom(s) you use, you may have to use 1.5-2x the amount (some mushrooms cook down more so than others). could see some seared asparagus (or more 'shrooms tbh!) going on top of the leftovers, yum.brooklynboyeatsBrooklyn, New York04/22/20Was a hit for all, great vegetarian entree. I tore my mushrooms on the smaller side, not realizing they'll shrink during cooking, so aim larger. Also, don't leave the stove while frying the shallots; they'll burn quickly as mine did in about three minutes with the occasional stirring as recommended. After I made that mistake, I subbed some leftover fried onions from thanksgiving which would make a perfect shortcut, though you'd lose the infused oil if you skip the shallots.Made it today and everybody loved it! Wonderful recipe!Made this twice before leaving a review because I was SO excited about every aspect of this dish. Followed to the recipe exactly both times and both times the end product just left something to be desired... I kept playing around with seasoning at the end (oil/lemon juice/sat/etc) and nothing really came together. Maybe some arugula mixed in? I’m not sure what it’s missing but the barley needs to be more zhuzzhed up because as a base it falls pretty flat. Might try this again with some major riffsAnonymousIndianapolis, IN11/28/19Really, really delicious. I upped the shallots & parmesan for added texture and umami. The herbs make it bright and zingy, while the mushrooms and parmesan give it a warm earthiness. I had quite a bit of shallot oil left over, but going to use it for some roasted veggies. Definitely recommend.AnonymousSydney, Australia 11/23/19Spectacular. This takes work, but it is worth it. Good for meal prep as well since all the oil keeps it from going dry. In love with the shallot oil. As written, the garlic doesn't make it to the final dish, it just flavors the mushrooms in the pan... I corrected that oversight.SrAsparagusOakland, CA11/15/19A bit too oily, in my opinion. The final flavour was not worth the hassle.zuziakdzAmsterdam10/03/19So good! Definitely give this recipe a try if you have some mushrooms to show off.Okay this is amazing. Full dusclosure to make it extra-ish, I fried up a little lardon, removed and drained, caramalized 2 leeks in the same oil, moved to a bowl, then cooked the shrooms in the oil as the recipe indicated. I also liberally dressed the barley with the shallot oil, and by that I mean poured most of it in for the grain to soak up, and served warm.AnonymousBrooklyn, NY12/07/17I love this recipe. I had never eaten barley as a salad. I loved the chew of the barley, the meatiness of the mushrooms, and the brightness of the fresh herbs and lemon. A keeper for sure.AnonymousYork, PA11/16/17

Barley in Every Meal

Barley is an healthy grain that can be beneficial for most diets, but sometimes it can be hard to know where to look for recipes that work. Have you been looking for a bunch of great barley recipes all in one place? If so, take a look at this collection below for barley recipes you could use every day.

To start off, here are two barley appetizers you can try at home. These barley dishes make for tasty lead ups to any meal, and provide the added nutritional benefits of having barley in your diet. The first barley appetizer is Grain and Spinach Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms. The bite sized appetizers include barley to stuff the mushrooms and spinach for a pop of green. Not your style? Take a look at this Butternut Squash Barley Risotto.

Main Course

Main dishes can be packed with barley too. These two recipes are wonderful examples of how barley can be used for everyday meals. Tomato & Mozzarella Barley Salad is a barley dish through and through. This easy to make meal is just a few ingredients. It can be served hot or cold, and makes for a great lunch. But if you need another main dish to fill out your day, take a look at Herby Barley Salad with Butter Basted Mushrooms. This dish is a little more involved, but the end result is a delicious barley mainstay.

Here are two desserts that both use barley as a main ingredient. Whether you prefer chocolate desserts, or lean more towards custards, you’re sure to love one of these barley packed options. First off, the Barley Snack Cake is a delicious treat that can satisfy a sweet tooth and provide nutritional benefits. A chocolate cake with a twist, it has the added benefits of barley. The other featured recipe, Baked Barley Pudding, is an example of using barley as a substitute grain. Here, the author switches out barley for rice in their pudding for the additional flavor that barley brings.

Barley is a versatile grain that can be used in many dishes, and these are just a few examples. Listed below are the recipe sources, along with other possible barley-based food ideas. For more information about barley, visit our homepage here.


Herby Barley Salad with Butter-Basted Mushrooms - Recipes

Rebecca Bitzer, MS RD, CEDRD suggests in her article linked below, "Six Reasons to Try a Blended Mushroom-Beef Burger”, replacing a portion of your beef with Mushrooms when making burgers. This will increase taste, improve the health properties, be better for the planet, and more. The mushroom’s umami flavor increases the savory, meaty flavor of burgers. Mushrooms also keep burgers moist while adding fiber, vitamin B, potassium, and immune-boosting properties. Phillips Gourmet's Blend-Ready® Moisture-Reduced Mushrooms are diced similar to the size of ground meat and keeps their shape well for forming burger patties with many proteins. Burgers that are 60% beef 40% mushroom - can save approximately 38% saturated fat, cholesterol, and calories!

So, if you're firing up the BBQ this weekend, maybe try adding some mushrooms into those burgers! You may be delightfully surprised!
Article: rbitzer.com/what-is-a-blended-mushroom-beef-burger/?utm_source=Sales+and+Marketing&utm_campaign=8.
More mushroom recipes: phillipsgourmet.com/recipes/ . See More See Less

Play

Americans consume on average about 3,400 mg of sodium per day however, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends adults limit sodium intake to less than 2,300 mg per day—that’s equal to about 1 teaspoon of table salt!

Diets higher in sodium are associated with an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, which is a major cause of stroke and heart disease.

KEEP THE FLAVOR, LOWER THE SODIUM - An easy way to lower the sodium of foods cooked at home is to incorporate mushrooms they're a great way to add flavor without adding salt. Mushrooms are rich in two of the three components of umami - a taste that enhances the flavor of foods. Umami is one of the five tastes along with sweetness, sourness, bitterness, and saltiness. There are some great recipes included in "Your Dietitian: Marvelous Mushrooms' Umami Flavor”, Phyllis Molnar, The Chronicle-Telegram, Source 1, Jun 02, 2021. chroniclet.com/news/263352/your-dietitian-marvelous-mushrooms-umami-flavor/?utm_source=Sales+and+.
More mushroom recipes: phillipsgourmet.com/recipes/

As a general guide: 5% DV or less of sodium per serving is considered low, and 20% DV or more of sodium per serving is considered high.

Play

15 Delicious Winter Salads That Feed a Crowd

Not a lot of people realize this, but winter is actually an amazing time for salads. Just because it's cold doesn't mean you won't have access to excellent, fresh produce. In fact, things like citrus, kale, and root vegetables are at their best from December to March. Plus, there's usually a good amount of late-season fall produce—like squash, apples, and pears—hanging around, which means you have plenty to choose from.

Aside from being a delicious way to take advantage of seasonal produce, winter salads can add some much-needed diversity to your holiday dinner table. Salads might not seem like a must-make when things like honey-baked ham and stuffing are on the itinerary, but trust me, they are. My mom never made salad for Thanksgiving or Christmas when I was growing up, so I didn't realize what a difference it can make on a holiday table until I left for college.

That first Thanksgiving away from home, a friend invited me to tag along to her family feast. Everything they served was par for the course, except for a simple kale salad, which Iɽ never seen in a T-Day spread before. I'll admit, I was a little skeptical at first. I thought, 'Who wants salad on Thanksgiving?' But, I added some to my plate to avoid being rude—and then went back for seconds. Since everything else was so decadent, I found myself taking bite after bite of that salad, using it as a sort of palate cleanser. It was delicious, fresh, and helped keep me from feeling overwhelmed by the richer offerings. I was hooked.

These days, every time I host a holiday feast or a winter dinner party, there's at least one salad on the table—I've even managed to get my mom on board! Now it's your turn. Go forth and make one of these 15 winter salads for your next holiday gathering. Most are big enough to feed a crowd, but the ones that aren't can easily be multiplied. And all of them will pair perfectly with your usual holiday suspects.


15 Healthy Fall Salad Recipes

Love them or hate them, we all know we need more of them.

But here’s the deal I have with vegetables If we dread them, avoid them or wish we were eating something else, then we might as well eat something else. The reality is if we can’t find a way to eat more vegetables and actually enjoy them <<- That’s the winning ticket>then we might keep eating them.

I mean how often do you find yourself sticking with something when you don’t necessarily love it?

Think running, you either love it or hate it. If you hate it you most likely will never do it. Or if you do try it out, it won’t stick.

Okay, okay so the point is, I have this strong passion for helping you find ways to eat vegetables and love it.

Including salads… which can often seem so drab.

So here are my quick tips to finding ways to love vegetables.

  1. Buy what is in season. It seems like a no-brainer but it is most common for us to repeatedly eat the same vegetables over and over. Remember satiety comes from change and what the change in season is. In the summer we are more likely to crave cold salads for satiety where the cooler months we definitely need something warm and hearty. Fortunately, seasonal produce tends to represent the season well. So stick with what is in season!
  2. Use layers. Just like a good wardrobe, a good meal is found in layers. This means having different textures, flavors, food groups and temperatures all on the plate at the same time. Layer and layer and layer and ending with a good sauce or dressing is really the recipe for success.
  3. Don’t forget a grain. I know, we live in this anti-carb society but the fall and winter months our bodies actually crave more carbohydrates for satiety reasons. I’m not telling you to binge on carbs but rather not forget the power of a bit of quinoa, lentils or wild rice can have on a salad.
  4. Change the cooking method. Pick out a handful of vegetables, grains and protein sources and vary the cooking method. Add some steamed, roasted and slow cooked sources to each salad to provide different flavors and textures.
  5. Prep ahead! In the midst of hunger I can assure you a salad is probably going to be the last thing on your mind. Especially when you have to drive by what seems like 20 fast food restaurants just to get home at the end of the busy day. Don’t wait to think, buy and prep a salad until you are starving, prep them ahead! Yes, the best salads are the ones that can be prepped in advance. Or at least the components of the recipe. I can assure you, if you have at least a handful of the ingredients prepped ahead, it will be easier to stick to the plan.

If you’re in need of a great source for not only planning your life (day organizer, and life planner) but also don’t want to forget the power of your own health on how much you get done, including MEAL PLANNING check out this new resource we’ve created for you!

There is power in one tool that can help you live your best life and we think this is it!

The only way I eat healthy while being the primary care taker of three young girls, home keeper, business owner, babysitter and wife is this weekly planner! And it was created with a lot of love, thought, knowledge and experience so you too can find the power in planning.

Ironically, this is all coming from what one would consider the least organized person ever. But that’s why it was created, because even the unorganized need organization. We just need the space to do it with our strengths instead of the normal rigid style we are used to seeing.

You can snag a free weekly planner page that has the meal planner included HERE!

In the meantime, here are those amazing fall salad recipes I’ve been promising:

Korean BBQ Bowls with Garlic Scented Rice

About Alexa

Alexa is a Nutritionist currently pursuing her Masters degree in Public Health. She specializes in helping her clients to see the whole picture of health and wellness and enjoys developing healthy grain free recipes and writing about various health topics. She lives in a cornfield in Iowa with her husband Payton and their three daughters, Ava, Addie and Auden.

Hi, I’m Alexa

As a nutritionist, I have a passion for helping you use real foods to create realistic changes into your life by incorporating good nutrition for the whole picture of health and wellness.


Watch the video: Rührei mit Pilzen - Keto-Genix Low-Carb Rezepte (May 2022).